Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th Global Summit on Plant Science Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

  • Plant Genetics and Epigenetics | Nanotechnology and Plant Sciences |Plant Ecology and Diversity | Forest Science & Technology
Location: Webinar

Session Introduction

Mohammad Golam Kibria

University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia

Title: Foliar magnesium application enhanced growth and root exudation from wheat in acid soil
Biography:

Mohammad Golam Kibria has completed his Bachelor and MSc with a Gold medal from Bangladesh Agricultural University. He started his Ph.D. in soil science and plant nutrition at The University of Western Australia from October 2017, and now he is in the final year of his Ph.D. He is the staff of the Department of Soil Science at Bangladesh Agricultural University, a leading agricultural university in Bangladesh. He has already published 11 papers in national and international journals and two book chapters. Currently, his research mainly focuses on plant nutrition, problem soil management, and plant stress physiology.

Abstract:

Soil acidity is one of the most important soil constraints for wheat growth, and magnesium (Mg) can play a critical role in mitigating the adverse effects of soil acidity on plants. There is, however, the limited information available about the influence of Mg nutrition, especially foliar application, on wheat growth in acidic soil. In a series of glasshouse experiments, the growth of two wheat genotypes differing in aluminium (Al) resistance was investigated with or without foliar Mg application. Applying Mg to foliage at the optimum rate (200 mg Mg/L) was associated with a significant increase in shoot and root dry biomass accumulation, root length and leaf chlorophyll content by 50%, 38%, and 10%, respectively compared to the treatment with no foliar Mg applied. This increase was higher in the Al-resistant wheat genotype compared with Al-sensitive one. Foliar Mg application at an optimum rate resulted in a significant increase in root exudation (malate and citrate), which contributes to enhancing wheat growth in acidic soil. The root exudation was higher in the Al-resistant wheat genotype compared to Al-sensitive one. It appears that growing Al-resistant genotype coupled with foliar Mg application at the optimum rate might be helpful to minimize the adverse effect of soil acidity on wheat growth

Biography:

Pedro Maldonado-Alvarado is Associate Professor at the Department of Food Sciences and Biotechnology in EPN and Collaborator professor of Ecuadoran universities as UTPL and UTA. He is PhD in Biochemistry, Chemistry and Food Technology of the Université Montpellier, France. Dr. Maldonado is director of 3 scientific projects and collaborator of 4 national and international projects. He have more than 20 scientific publications. He works in Valorization of Ecuadorian products and by-products, particularly farinaceous. Also, extraction of active principles and interest molecules of food and non-food matrix. Finally, on food safety in Ecuador, particularly the incidence of heavy metals on foods

 

Abstract:

In this study, rheological, functional and sensory properties of gluten-free bread formulations from quinoa and banana flour, cassava starch, lupine flour (HC) or whey protein (PL) with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and transglutaminase (TG), as enhancers, were evaluated. The effect of TG at different concentrations (0; 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 %) on HC or PL proteins was evaluated, quantifying free amino groups and thiols, apparent viscosity and electrophoresis. Cross- linking analyzes showed better results at 1% of TG. The characterization of the dough, pasting properties were evaluated by MIXOLAB and RVA, respectively. The firmness, crumb structure and loaf volume were analyzed, respectively, through a texturometer, ImageJ software and baking capacity. An experimental design of response surface was carried out to determine different breadmaking mixtures, where the HPMC and HC or PL varied from 0.5-2.5 % and 3.0-9.0 %, respectively. In addition, an optimization was carried out to get the best percentages of HPMC (1.80%) and HC (8.30%) or PL (8.33%). In HC, positive correlations of 0.84 and 0.92 between protein parameters (C2) with starch retrogradation (C3) and starch fragmentation (BD) with maximum starch viscosity (PV), respectively, were found. In PL, a R2 = 0.99 was determined between C3 and alpha-amylase activity (C4) and R2 = 0.85 and 0.83 between C2 with PV and C2 with BD were reported. Thus, the interaction between raw materials and improvers was evidently maximized for breadmaking

Biography:

Marine Bezhuashvili is a Chemist in the Department of Chemistry at IV Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University (1981), is a Candidate of Technical Sciences, Technology of Fermentation Products, Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Drinks, Georgian Scientific-Research Institute of Horticulture, Viticulture and Wine-making, 1987. She is a Doctor of Technical Sciences, Technology of Wine, Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Drinks and Mineral Waters; Bioorganic Chemistry Georgian Scientific-Research Institute of Horticulture, Viticulture and Wine-making, 1994. Currently she is working in the Institute of Viticulture and Oenology of Agricultural University of Georgia.

Abstract:

It is studied Georgian red vine  variaty Shavkapito healthy and infected  leaves by downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola berl.) stilbenoids quantity and qualitative compounds. The simples were taken in east part of Georgia from the soil Eutric cambisols of 15  years of vineyard. Stilbenoids containing fractions were isolated  from the objects by ethylacetate.  This fractions were processed with appropriate method and were analysed by HPLC/MS. It is established stress-metabolite stilbenoids, among them dominate trans-resveratrol and trans-ε-viniferin. In infected by downy mildew leaves were fixed  concentration increase. In concret, trans-resveratrol from 1,57 mg/kg to 15,23 mg/kg. Trans-ε-viniferin from 10,92 mg/kg to 18,51 mg/kg.  The results of the experiment is scientific novelty for the Shavkapito grape variety and is important for establishing in future of the vine immunity  correlation with phytoalexins- stilbenoids

Biography:

Dr. Montaser Fawzy Abdel-Monaim from Researcher Agriculture Research Center, Egypt Highest Degree Ph.D. in Plant Pathology from Minia University, Egypt

 

Abstract:

Charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina on cowpea results in yield losses with serious socioeconomic implication. Sixteen isolates of M. phaseolina were isolated from cowpea diseased plants collected from different locations in New Valley Governorate. All obtained isolates able to attack cowpea plants (cv. Balady) causing charcoal rot on the basil stem with various degrees of diseases severity. M. phaseolina isolate No. 14 was the most aggressive ones in this respect causing 85.8% charcoal rot.

Potassium silicate (KS), propyl gallate (PG), hydroquinone (HQ) and salicylic acid (SA) at 1,5 and 10 mM were used in this investigation as promising methods for controlling such diseases in vitro and in vivo. Results illustrated that all tested chemical inducers were little effect on growth of M. phaseolina at different concentrations in vitro. The inhibition growth of M. phaseolina was slightly increased by increasing of chemical inducers concentrations. Under greenhouse and field conditions, all tested chemical inducers significantly decreased charcoal rot compared to the check treatment (control). Propyl gallate and HQ resulted the lowest charcoal rot severity. On contrary, SA and KS recorded the lowest protection against charcoal rot severity

Also, all tested chemical inducers significantly improvement cowpea plant growth parameters viz. plant length, No. of branches/plant, fresh and dry weight of plants (kg/feddan) and yield components viz. pod length (cm), No. of seed pod-1, weight of 100 seeds, total seed yield (Kg fed.-1) compared with control during seasons 2014-2015 and 2005-2016. Cow pea seeds soaked in PG at 5 mM recorded the highest yield components in both seasons. While, HQ recorded the lowest ones. Analysis of plant mineral compositions showed a significant increase in contents of nitrogen (N), potassium (K), phosphorus (P), and crude protein in cowpea plants  grown from cowpea seeds treated with any chemical inducers compared with control plants during growing seasons (2014-2015 and 2015-2016). Salicylic acid followed by PG gave the height mineral contents in both growing seasons.

Accumulation of ascorbate peroxidase (APO), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes, pathogenesis related (PR) protein (chitinase an β-1,3- glucanase), phenolic, flavonoids and lignin contents in plants inoculated with M. phaseolina  treated with chemical inducers were increased compared with untreated inoculated and untreated un-inoculated plants. PG recorded the highest levels of oxidative enzymes, pathogenesis related (PR) protein and phenol, flavonoid, lignin contents during all tested periods of determination. In general, enzymes activities of APO, PPO, and β- 1,3- gluconase begin to accumulate after two days of treatment and reached maximum levels at 8 th days  while, PAL, SOD, chitinase reached maximum levels at 6th days  then the activities of these enzymes were decreased progressively. On the other hand, total phenols, flolvoniads and lignin increased in cowpea plants inoculated with M. phaseolina and treated with tested inducers. The highest accumulation of phenols was recorded 6th days from application, while flavonoids and lignin recorded the highest level at 8th days from application. These results suggested that these chemicals may be play an important role in controlling the cowpea charcoal rot disease, through they have induction of systemic resistance in cowpea plants. 

 

Biography:

B.Sc. in Agriculture (Hons.), MS in Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh

 

Abstract:

The breeding of tossa jute plant is the main way to develop its qualitative and quantitative traits like higher fiber yield with good qualities, but it is problematic due to narrow genetic base and high photosensitivity of jute plant. Bangladesh Jute Research Institute developed a new high yielding tossa jute (Corchorus olitorius L.) variety (MG-1) through pure line selection method during 2015-17. The tossa jute experimental materials were collected from Uganda used with control variety BJRI Tossa pat-5 (O-795). A variety (OM-1) with ovate glossy leaves, gray seeds was developed by hybridization from these genotypes. A segregated genotype (MG-1) with ovate lanceolate glossy leaves, bluish green seeds was isolated from OM-1 by pure line selection (PLS) from OM-1 through evaluation of yield and yield attributing traits. Then it was released as BJRI tossa pat-7 or MG-1 based on its fiber yield performance in fields. The MG-1 gave 3.36 t ha-1 fiber yield than control variety O-795 (3.22 t ha-1) by maintaining 3.50-4.00 lac ha-1 plant population in farmer’s field which is 5.41% higher comparatively. MG-1 gave average 3.40 t ha-1 fiber yields and showed good results for anatomical features. This high yielding variety will be used for quality fiber production in future

 

Biography:

Iam from Nigeria and my primary education at the Command Children’s School, Ikeja, Lagos, Command Secondary School, Ipaja, Lagos and proceeded to the Lagos State university, Ojo in Nigeria. Where he studied Geography and graduated in 1999.

Abstract:

Plant tissue culture offer a means for the rapid production of disease-free plants in large quantities, however fungi contamination is a major constraint to its successful application. This study characterized, identified and conducted phylogenetic analysis on fungi contaminants of in vitro cultured banana based on inter-space (ITS) regions sequence. Genomic DNA were extracted from pure culture of fungi contaminants. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and Illumina short sequence were conducted using ITS1 and ITS4 primers. The nucleotide sequences were aligned for consensus and compared with NCBI GenBank using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Analysis of the sequences using MEGA 7 Software at higher similarity sequence identified five Aspergillus spp., three Penicillium spp., 1 each of Fusarium, Trichoderma and Cladosporium species as the contaminants. The overall genetic distance between the fungi species was 0.205 and the Maximum Composite Likelihood of nucleotide substitution showed Thyiamine is the most stable. The fungi were clustered in three major groups at 0.10 genetic distance which subdivided into five clusters. A cluster and sub-cluster of five Aspergillus strains; a major cluster of three Penicillium strains; a cluster comprising of Fusarium chlamydosporum and Trichoderma viride; and, a sole fungi Cladosporium tenuissimum. The Aspergillus group were phylogenetically related to A. flavus and A. parrisclerotigenus, the identified Penicillium spp were closely related to Penicellium citrinum while the detected Cladosporium aligned with Cladosporium tenuissium and Phoma multirostrata. The study concludes that molecular identification of the fungi contaminants covers the setbacks of conventional methods and the information provided could be helpful in development of specific and effective sterilization protocol to minimize contamination during in vitro culture procedure

Biography:

Dr Dalya Gereige has completed her PhD at the age of 27 years from Strasbourg University (UDS) and the institute of plant molecular biology (IBMP)- Strasbourg and postdoctoral studies from the national institute for agronomical research (INRA). She works currently as associate professor in the Lebanese University Faculty of Sciences. She is interested in plant - virus interaction research as well as identifying tobamoviruses infecting crop plants in Lebanon.

 

Abstract:

The tobacco mosaic virus, of the Tobamovirus genus, has been named as the most important virus in the plant virology community. It infects cultivated plants and in particular tobacco and other members of the Solanaceae family. Our study was conducted to detect tobamovirus infections of tobacco crops in 55 regions of northern Lebanon. The detection of tobacco mosaic virus was conducted using Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA), and was confirmed by RT-PCR using primers that amplify different regions of the viral genome. The ELISA tests showed a positive result suggesting TMV infection in 4 tobacco samples out of 92 samples taken from Akkar and Daniye, which was confirmed by PCR using a specific primer that amplifies an 880 bp PCR product representing a part of the replicase gene. PCR was also performed using primers that amplify regions throughout the viral genome, the results showed that for a single sample we were able to amplify all regions throughout the viral genome, but for the other three samples we were able to amplify only a part of the viral genome. thus, this may be due to a mutation in the region that encodes the capsid protein (CP) and the movement protein (MP), and at a part of the region that encodes the replicases. Alternatively, the three samples may have been infected with different TMV isolates or even different tobamoviruses. Sequencing of the PCR products will provide clarity in this matter. Our study was the first in Lebanon showing TMV infection in tobacco leaves.

RAVIMANNAN N

UNIVERSITY OF JAFFNA, SRI LANKA

Title: Isolation and Identification of yeasts from foods
Biography:

Completed special degree in Botany in the University of Jaffna in 1988 and was successful in obtaining an MPhil degree in Food Science and Technology in the Post graduate Institute of Agriculture, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka  in 1997. Attached to the Department of Botany, University of Jaffna as a senior lecturer. Have done several researches in the storage of yeasts in laboratories, alternative culture media for yeasts and isoaltion of yeasts from traditional fermented foods. Have presented papers in international conferences held in Thailand, Malaysia and India. Went to Australia as a visiting academic and underwent a short term training program under ADB fund

Abstract:

Several food samples from traditional fermented products (Idli, Dosai), Manihot, dairy products like curd and milk,  beverages like toddy and wine were taken and tested for the presence of various  yeasts. Idli and Dosai were observed for fermentation in the laboratory, University of Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Milk, toddy and wine were bought in the sales outlets in Thirunelvely, Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Different types of yeasts were isolated and grown in peptone yeast extract agar and pure cultures were obtained and maintained in slants for identification. The yeasts were identified based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified in the samples of traditional fermented products like Idli and Dosai. It was also identified in Manihot, curd and wine. Schizosaccharomyces pombe was identified in the sample of toddy. The yeast Candida pelliculosa was found to be present in milk. Further studies should be carried out at molecular level to identify different strains of particular yeast..

Biography:

Prof Dr Habib Ahmad is presently working as the Vice Chancellor of the historic Islamia College, Peshawar, Pakistan. He is Tenured Professor of Genetics. He has received various awards in recognition of his scientific research and achievements. He has got the coveted honour of being a resource person and an inspirational speaker at many national and international universities. He is the author of more than 300 hundred research papers. Along with his exceptional contributions to Genetics, Prof Habib has emerged as an authority on biodiversity and molecular anthropology of Hindu Kush Himalayas of Pakistan.

 

Abstract:

Pakistan is an agricultural country facing severe shortage of edible oil production. Statistics about the edible oil import Pakistan shows that it ranks no 1 on the list of imported food items. For instance the total edible oil demand of the country for the year 2017-18, was 4.268 million tonnes, out of which only12% i.e. 0.533 million tonnes was produced locally and the rest (88%) was imported costing US$ 3.63 billion of foreign exchange. It is hurting to note that that since year 2000, the imports of edible oil is doubled, while progress in its domestic production is stagnant. The availability of high yielding quality certified seed the main obstacle for getting self-sufficiency in edible oil production. Hence a research project was initiated on wide hybridization for genetic transgression through alien genetic transfer in 1998. A high yielding, early maturing, non-shattering, aphid resistant rapeseed variety, Hasnain 2013 was developed and was released by the relevant agencies in 2013, for general cultivation. Hasnain 2013 produce three times more seed as compared to local cultivars. Hence a project was initiated for maximization of Hasnain-2013 through production of best quality certified seed for improved farm production for improved livelihood of the farmer and reducing import bill of the edible oil. The early generation seed was sown on 200 acres of land of the progressive farmers. Simultaneously, on site field days and awareness seminars were organized regarding field performance of Hasnain-2013. We distributed 12.5 tons of certified seed, wherefrom 50 tonnes of certified seed is procured. The variety produce almost three times more seed as compared to local cultivars, hence widely accepted by the rapeseed growers. This paper communicates our field experience with the development of improved seed, its maintenance, maximization, certification and large scale seed production for extraction of edible oil and sustainably running the seed industry